Suncorp ‘Team Girls Rally Cry’ encourages and motivates young girls to embrace life confidently!

Do your daughters play sport? Are you struggling to keep them engaged in sport as they get older. Well, it seems like you aren’t alone! We were invited to watch the Vixens play netball a few weeks ago and to witness the powerful launch of Suncorp Team Girls!

Suncorp recently revealed the shocking findings of the ‘2019 Australian Youth Confidence Report’, revealing more than half of parents are concerned about their daughter’s self-esteem. Hands up who can relate to this!

I was so shocked to learn that these findings coincide with 46% of Australian teen girls turning their back on sport by the age of 17, despite two-thirds acknowledging that sport can make them feel more confident. Why are our young women giving up on sport when they know it makes them feel great?

The national survey of over 1000 Australian parents and teenagers conducted as part of the Suncorp Team Girls initiative, also revealed that confidence and the perception of themselves is one of the most commonly discussed topics in their home.

 Sport plays a pivotal role in building confidence in all areas of life, and it’s so important that we are getting and giving the support our daughters need to keep them on the court. For all of us with daughter’s who still play on a team, we know just how beneficial it is, in so many ways. The confidence I see in my own daughter when she is on the netball court is proof alone, that playing sport is a valuable weapon in combatting a mental health condition. 

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Have a Hero – Poppy & her hero Caitlin Thwaites

“Our research tells us participation in team sport nurtures perseverance, resilience and confidence; essential skills teen girls need now and in the future. This, in turn, can have a real positive impact on their health and wellbeing, career prospects and financial security moving forwards,” Suncorp’s Executive General Manager Brand & Marketing, Mim Haysom

“We are Team Girls – hear us roar!”

In response to the new findings and to drive awareness of the plight that parents and young girls face, Suncorp has launched a new Team Girls Rally Cry to encourage and motivate young girls to embrace life confidently, on and off the court. Championing the cause and inspiring Australian girls to stay in the game, is Australian electronic music songstress, Thandi Phoenix, a rising star of an equally male-dominated scene.

Suncorp’s research draws a direct link for girls of all ages between being confident and achieving success in a range of life dimensions, including their work and social lives. The benefits of sports are widely recognised to have lifetime impacts, as sport is felt to build fundamental life skills like team building, leadership and resilience.


Suncorp Team Girls Ambassador Rebecca Sparrow – teen Agony Aunt, podcast host and author of ‘Game On! A Team Girls Guide to Getting Active’. offers her tips on what parents can do boost participation:

  • Encourage girls to try sports their friends are playing as they will be more willing to get involved.  If your daughter’s friends are playing netball or hockey or AFL — talk to your daughter about joining their team for a season. Or start playing a new sport with a friend.

  • Become a fan. Get your daughter excited about the sport by following the national league and experiencing the excitement of a live game. Introduce your daughter to a terrific role model like netball’s Gabi Simpson and Gretel Tippett, AFL’s Tayla Harris and Moana Hope or cricket’s Ellyse Perry. Start following the players on social media.

  • Chill out. Many kids cringe at their parents’ sideline behaviour.  Keep the focus on fun rather than form and leave the feedback to the coaches.  The goal is for kids to have fun and be active.

  • Allow them to try different sports. Some kids take a while to find the sport which ignites them.  Trying a few different sports is a great way to find the right fit.

  • If your daughter suddenly wants to quit her team sport, listen to her reasons and explore whether joining a less competitive team would be of interest.

 

 “Sport actively builds that inner grit we all need to handle life.” Rebecca Sparrow


Key Findings of the ‘2019 Suncorp Australian Youth and Confidence Report’:

  • Only 55 per cent of Australian girls age 11-17 play sport in a typical week, compared to 69 per cent of boys of the same age

  • 15-17-year-old girls are significantly more likely to be playing less sport (46 per cent) in the last 12 months or to have completely stopped, compared to 15-17 boys (30 per cent)

  • 11-17-year-old girls are significantly less active (-1 hr 18 mins) than boys of the same age in a typical week

  • 15% of girls don’t like playing sport because they don’t think they’re ‘any good’, a close second to ‘having too much schoolwork’

  • Two-thirds (67 per cent) of girls age 11-17 acknowledged that sport can make them feel confident or ‘good about themselves’

  • 54% of boys aged 11 -17 feel confident as a result of playing team sport compared to 37 per cent of girls in the same age group

  • The findings highlight the importance of peers and loved ones to drive their confidence; 9 in 10 girls aged 11 – 17 admit to deriving confidence through support from friends and family

  • 8 in 10 girls believe that it is important for girls to support one another.

  • Girl’s favourite sports include dance (24 per cent), swimming (18 per cent), netball (16 per cent), basketball, soccer and gym (all 10 per cent)

If you are struggling to keep your daughter in sport, have a read of the ultimate guide for parents to teach your teens and tweens about the benefits of playing sports.

 


 

Stay positive, stay fighting, stay brave, stay ambitious, stay focussed, stay strong!

Liv xxx

 

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